jmjafrx:

newmodelminority:

prettyofcenter:

when you come to this blog please understand that it is sometimes like an installation art piece. i exhibit some deep intense feelings, let who ever is online at the time get a glimpse then i take it down. if you see it you were meant to see it and if you miss it there is more to come at another time. 

Word. Same.

Yes. Same x 2 + 100 for each space, each blog, each Tumblr, each IG post…

blackgirlsarefromthefuture:

khalebsalah:

Can’t afford art? Want to support an artist? I have to sell 18 tickets today! Ahhh! So for every ticket sold I’ll send you a piece of artwork! Yes! That is artwork for $15 bucks… You spend that much at chipotle… I’m saying! And for the 18th ticket sold I’m giving away commissioned portrait signed by me!! :) Dont have $15 then reblog? maybe? Thank you love bugs.
Click here for tickets: http://rawartists.org/philadelphia/communique/?artist=210485

#Philly

blackgirlsarefromthefuture:

khalebsalah:

Can’t afford art? Want to support an artist? I have to sell 18 tickets today! Ahhh! So for every ticket sold I’ll send you a piece of artwork! Yes! That is artwork for $15 bucks… You spend that much at chipotle… I’m saying! And for the 18th ticket sold I’m giving away commissioned portrait signed by me!! :) Dont have $15 then reblog? maybe? Thank you love bugs.

Click here for tickets: http://rawartists.org/philadelphia/communique/?artist=210485

#Philly

smartgirlsattheparty:

faustus-syndrome:

Some art-quotes from Carol Rossetti 
Facebook | Tumblr

Some great stuff here :) 

(via newwavefeminism)

sunflower-mama:

This is what heaven looks like

(Source: beautifulonfire, via bitchisyouserious)

creativetime:

Just another weekend celeb spotting at the Domino Sugar Factory! On Sunday, Beyoncé, Jay Z, Blue Ivy, Alicia Keys, Swizz Beatz & kids met Kara Walker at the exhibition. Who knows who will stop by next?

so-treu:

thepeoplesrecord:

Apartheid in Detroit: Water for corporations, not people
June 18, 2014

Biill and Hillary Clinton were up to their ears in more than $10 million worth of legal debt at the end of Clinton’s tenure as president. Donald Trump was bailed out of four bankruptcies. But Detroit residents are having a basic human right – the access to water – cancelled for being late on bills of $150.

In the spring, Detroit’s Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr ordered water shutoffs for 150,000 Detroit residents late on their bills. Orr is an unelected bureaucrat accountable only to Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, who appointed Orr and several other “emergency managers” in largely poor, black communities like Detroit, Benton Harbor, Flint, and Highland Park, to make all financial decisions on behalf of local elected governments.

Orr’s plan will shut off water for 1,500 to 3,000 Detroit residents each week. Neither Orr nor Homrich, the contracting company Orr hired to shut off residents’ water, answered calls for interview requests.

Detroit citizens have been protesting the decision on the basis that water is a human right that cannot be denied to families who need it for cooking, bathing and flushing toilets. Many residents facing water shutoffs are currently on monthly payment plans with the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD), paying upwards of $160 per month as water rates continue to rise, and were given no prior notice that their water was about to be cut off. Last week, the Detroit City Council held a public hearing to discuss a proposed 4 percent hike in water rates.

“The families I’ve talked to in my neighborhood and others around the city are confused about why they’re being hit (in this way),” community activist Russ Bellant told the Michigan Citizen. “Some knew they were behind, but thought they’d have time to pay it. These are people who mow the lawn on the vacant lots next door (to them).”

As the Michigan Citizen reported, residents with delinquent water bills are losing their water while prominent Detroit corporations with much larger delinquent water bills are being left alone. The Palmer Park Golf Club owes $200,000. Joe Louis Arena, home of the Detroit Red Wings, owes DWSD $80,000. Ford Field owes $55,000. Kevyn Orr is arguing that the shutoffs are necessary to pay for the DWSD infrastructure – yet when Detroit raised $1 billion in bonds to pay for new infrastructure, $537 million of it went to banks like JPMorgan Chase, UBS and Morgan Stanley to pay off interest instead.

Community activists are placing blame on the structural, institutionalized poverty in Detroit that forces the people to foot the bill for corporate mismanagement. Detroit’s bankruptcy and urban blight is a direct result of the housing bubble that burst, putting over 60,000 homes in foreclosure and rendering thousands of families homeless.

Dan Gilbert, the billionaire owner of Quicken Loans who is financing much of the gentrified development of downtown Detroit, has been particularly blamed for his company’s role in exacerbating the foreclosure crisis through its intimidation of homeowners, pressuring them into risky subprime lending schemes.

“Instead of going after the corporate institutions who owe millions, they’d rather turn off the water for poor people,” said Demeeko Williams, an organizer with Detroiters Resisting Emergency Management.

To fight back, Williams and other community activist groups like Moratorium NOW! and the Detroit After Party are teaming up to create theDetroit Water Brigade, a mutual aid effort aimed at providing residents with water and stopping water shutoffs with nonviolent direct action. The Detroit Water Brigade has set up a bridal registry on Amazon.com inviting those interested to help purchase necessary supplies like water coolers, cases of bottled water, heavy-duty contractor bags, and orange safety vests.

Some of the more radical direct actions being promoted by the Detroit Water Brigade include distributing flyers instructing people on how to turn their own water back on after it’s been shut off, and how to pre-emptively stop contractors from shutting water for their home. The flyer reads:

“Step 1: If your water is off, have the neighborhood water person or a friend (not you) obtain a water key and turn it back on 1st. (If you expect your water to be turned off, go to step 2.)

“Step 2: Purchase ready mix cement from the hardware [store].

“Step 3: Fill lockbox pipe 3/4ths full with dry cement mix.

“Step 4: Add water to top off. Don’t use rocks because rocks can be sucked out.”

The Detroit Water Brigade is also meeting regularly to train interested residents in nonviolent civil disobedience. Residents are planning to form human chains putting themselves between water lockboxes and contractors hired to shut off water. The water brigade is counting on Detroit’s understaffed police department to not have the resources to arrest and jail everyone participating in the water shutoff demonstrations.

In response to sustained protests from Detroit residents, the DWSD has removed the “Water Shut Off” decals from its trucks.

Source

but #WesternPrivilege means things like this never happen in the west!!!1!!!!11!

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

moyazb:

Hey tumblr. Quick question. I’ve been asked to sign this petition going around that wants to include women of color’s interests as part of Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper. I’m feeling conflicted. I don’t trust the administration, and there’s a piece of this that feels so paternalistic and honestly…

cultureunseen:

Salute to Sister Soldier Yuri Kochiyama!

Born May 19, 1921 (93 years young and strong)
An extraordinary Japanese American woman who spoke out and fought shoulder-to-shoulder with African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and Whites for social justice, civil rights, and prisoners and women’s rights in the U.S. and internationally for over half a century. A prolific writer and speaker on human rights, Kochiyama has spoken at over 100 colleges and universities and high schools in the U.S. and Canada.

http://www.amazon.com/Heartbeat-Struggle-Revolutionary-Kochiyama-Critical/dp/0816645930

yarrahs-life:

jaredculture:

yarrahs-life:

jaredculture:

yarrahs-life:

an-accidentalmemory:

naturalprose:

niggawillyoushutthefuckup:

eastafriqueen:

myblack-is-beautiful:

youngblackandvegan:

y’all need to stop sleeping on rihanna
i’m telling you

Half the people bashing her don’t even know she was paying homage to her.

it’s funny cause there were so many comments (by men, mostly) speaking on Maya Angelou and other black women icons and idols not even knowing their back story and furthermore bashing her (and them, unknowingly)

Thats why i sat back and SHUT THE FUCK UP.

Basics gotta learn. I saw it long before and damn near cried.


i knew it from the moment i saw that outfit. 

That’s great! Ms. Baker has inspired me in many ways as well. One of them by showing me how a woman can be feminine and still be powerful! But at the ends of the day, I still would not like to dress like her, bc basically she was a topless dancer. That’s not my occupation, nor do I have a desire to dress like one. I pull from her style in other ways and use other references that reflect her. Bc I don’t not think it’s appropriate to show my nipples, and to walk around like that. So I would never copy that. Just bc some of us aren’t riding Rihanna’s dick for walking around half naked, and praising her and forming our own opinions, doesn’t mean we’re basic or misinformed about fashion. I knew right away who she was inspired by, bc her makeup and hairstyle gave it away. However I still think her dress was tacky. At the same time I respect her for not giving a fuck and wearing what she wanted. Meanwhile as a celebrity, that dress was a publicity stunt and don’t think for a second Rihanna didn’t know what would happen.

    It never ceases to surprise me how many people buy into the human body is inappropriate mythology. I think it’s a beautiful thing for someone to be confident enough to put themselves on display and to subvert societal conventions at the same time.

Or can it be that certain ppl just don’t want their bodies on display? I could say ppl who display their nude bodies actually lack confidence, and need to feel affirmed by it, bc of their need for attention. But how ridiculous, one sided and pretentious would that be? *side eye* OR I can just conclude, that some ppl like being on display and some don’t and BOTH are ok.



I just wanted to contribute my opinion to the conversation. I could be projecting but it sounds to me like you’re looking for an argument. At the risk of sounding dismissive I don’t feel like you in any way addressed what I was talking about. Maybe I could have been more clear but in my first point I was referring to the way people judge the way other people dress. My main point was that I think that the human body is beautiful and if someone wants to show it off for any reason I wish people wouldn’t have a problem with that. I wasn’t saying at all that everyone should put themselves on display.

I did address what you said. And I have no problem with ppl who feel like displaying their nude bodies, bc I’m for ppl making choices for themselves. What I said was her dress was tacky. Tacky meaning something I wouldn’t EVER wear. I’m not like these ppl out here calling her a slut and shaming her for choice. Bc that’s wrong! It’s wrong to label a person based off of your preference. Especially when half these guys calling her a slut, will use what they saw as stimulating material to jerk off to. I just think her dress was tacky. My opinion. Which I’m allowed to definitely have. That’s the end. It’s more so ppl trying to create a divide by making this conversation about her dress uncomfortable by making it black and white… And if you’re not riding, you’re opinion is negative and ur shaming her. Which is dumb af really! You said ppl buy into the mythology that the human body needs to be hidden. I feel like you were implying that ppl who display their bodies are liberated, and those who don’t are bound by that idea. I said to you, that it’s not about liberation or being bound, by giving the opposite example of what you stated. My response to you was saying that it’s more about choice and preferences. Some ppl CHOOSE to show their bodies and some ppl CHOOSE not to. For whatever reasons. And then I said both are ok.

yarrahs-life:

jaredculture:

yarrahs-life:

jaredculture:

yarrahs-life:

an-accidentalmemory:

naturalprose:

niggawillyoushutthefuckup:

eastafriqueen:

myblack-is-beautiful:

youngblackandvegan:

y’all need to stop sleeping on rihanna

i’m telling you

Half the people bashing her don’t even know she was paying homage to her.

it’s funny cause there were so many comments (by men, mostly) speaking on Maya Angelou and other black women icons and idols not even knowing their back story and furthermore bashing her (and them, unknowingly)

Thats why i sat back and SHUT THE FUCK UP.

Basics gotta learn. I saw it long before and damn near cried.

i knew it from the moment i saw that outfit.

That’s great! Ms. Baker has inspired me in many ways as well. One of them by showing me how a woman can be feminine and still be powerful! But at the ends of the day, I still would not like to dress like her, bc basically she was a topless dancer. That’s not my occupation, nor do I have a desire to dress like one. I pull from her style in other ways and use other references that reflect her. Bc I don’t not think it’s appropriate to show my nipples, and to walk around like that. So I would never copy that. Just bc some of us aren’t riding Rihanna’s dick for walking around half naked, and praising her and forming our own opinions, doesn’t mean we’re basic or misinformed about fashion. I knew right away who she was inspired by, bc her makeup and hairstyle gave it away. However I still think her dress was tacky. At the same time I respect her for not giving a fuck and wearing what she wanted. Meanwhile as a celebrity, that dress was a publicity stunt and don’t think for a second Rihanna didn’t know what would happen.

It never ceases to surprise me how many people buy into the human body is inappropriate mythology. I think it’s a beautiful thing for someone to be confident enough to put themselves on display and to subvert societal conventions at the same time.

Or can it be that certain ppl just don’t want their bodies on display? I could say ppl who display their nude bodies actually lack confidence, and need to feel affirmed by it, bc of their need for attention. But how ridiculous, one sided and pretentious would that be? *side eye* OR I can just conclude, that some ppl like being on display and some don’t and BOTH are ok.

I just wanted to contribute my opinion to the conversation. I could be projecting but it sounds to me like you’re looking for an argument. At the risk of sounding dismissive I don’t feel like you in any way addressed what I was talking about. Maybe I could have been more clear but in my first point I was referring to the way people judge the way other people dress. My main point was that I think that the human body is beautiful and if someone wants to show it off for any reason I wish people wouldn’t have a problem with that. I wasn’t saying at all that everyone should put themselves on display.

I did address what you said. And I have no problem with ppl who feel like displaying their nude bodies, bc I’m for ppl making choices for themselves. What I said was her dress was tacky. Tacky meaning something I wouldn’t EVER wear. I’m not like these ppl out here calling her a slut and shaming her for choice. Bc that’s wrong! It’s wrong to label a person based off of your preference. Especially when half these guys calling her a slut, will use what they saw as stimulating material to jerk off to. I just think her dress was tacky. My opinion. Which I’m allowed to definitely have. That’s the end. It’s more so ppl trying to create a divide by making this conversation about her dress uncomfortable by making it black and white… And if you’re not riding, you’re opinion is negative and ur shaming her. Which is dumb af really! You said ppl buy into the mythology that the human body needs to be hidden. I feel like you were implying that ppl who display their bodies are liberated, and those who don’t are bound by that idea. I said to you, that it’s not about liberation or being bound, by giving the opposite example of what you stated. My response to you was saying that it’s more about choice and preferences.

Some ppl CHOOSE to show their bodies and some ppl CHOOSE not to. For whatever reasons. And then I said both are ok.

(Source: latkeprincess)

tallestmidget:

casual-randoms:

jack-frost-froze:

mrfalling12345:

OMG WHAT DID I DO!?

For mobile just hold the reblog button

I LEARNED A THING

EVERYONE NEEDS TO KNOW THIS OMFG

For you Mac users thats: option + z + click reblog

(Source: funny-gif-1, via amaditalks)

#wisandtam #blackgirlsarefromthefuture. Girl.

#wisandtam #blackgirlsarefromthefuture. Girl.

transfeminism:

In 1979, Black women were being murdered in Boston. The murders started in January and by April six cis women had been killed. By June, 13 cis women were dead, 12 Black and one White.
Boston Police showed little interest taking the murders of Black cis women they alleged to be prostitutes seriously. So the Combahee River Collective, a Boston Black feminist organization, other Third World feminists as well as White antiracist feminists all with a political understanding of how violence against women is both racialized and sexualized started to organized and rally around the murders of these cis women. Out of this the group CRISIS, with a focus on self-help and community involvement, and the Coalition for Women’s Safety, a coalition of Black, Latin@ and White working to develop programs for community safety, were formed.
Throughout the organizing, Black and Third World feminists encountered conflicts with how the murders were being narrowly framed. Some within the community treated the murders as purely racial, downplaying or ignoring the obvious gendered and sexualized aspects of these killings. And male paternalism contributed to the proposal for Black men “to protect their women.” There were also racial barriers that complicated alliance building between White and Black women over the murders.
To address these and other issues concerning the political consciousness within the communities affected by the murders, the Combahee River Collective produced a pamphlet addressing the question: “Why did these women die?”:


In the Black community the murders have often been talked about as solely racial or racist crimes. It’s true that the police and media response has been typically racist. It’s true that the victims were all Black and that Black people have always been targets of racist violence in this society, but they were also all women. Our sisters died because they were women just as surely as they died because they were Black. If the murders were only racial, young teen-age boys and older Black men might also have been unfortunate victims. They might now be petrified to walk the streets as women have always been.


The pamphlet goes on to give some statistics and notes:


These statistics apply to all women: Black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, old, young, rich, poor and in between. We’ve got to understand that violence against us as women cuts across all racial, ethnic and class lines. This doesn’t mean that violence against Third World women does not have a racial as well as sexual cause. Both our race and sex lead to violence against us.


It’s now 33 years later and I see strong parallels between the sort of organizing that took place around those 13 women and the sort of organizing we need to be doing around the murder and violence taking place against trans women of color.
Within the LGBT community the murders of trans people are talked about like they are solely cissexist or anti-trans based. But like the Combahee River Collective’s analysis of the Boston murders of Black cis women, we need to have an analysis that accounts for the fact that almost all murdered trans people are women or on otherwise on the trans female spectrum, and that the vast majority are women of color. It’s important that we understand that trans people are being targeted as much for their gender identity and race as for the fact that they are also trans.
While the analysis of LGBT organizations tends to be too narrow, the attention these murders get from most feminist and antiracist organizations is virtually nonexistence. The framing of these these murders as the victims transness or sexuality is not helpful to the extent that it lets feminist and antiracist organizers off the hook by being able to say it is a “trans issue” as opposed to a women’s issue or a racial issue.
When it comes to violence against trans women, it’s time we start taking the question “Why did they did?” more seriously. We need to move beyond events like “Trans Day of Remembrance” that intentionally erase the gendered, racialized and classed analysis of why certain trans people are being killed. Even “Trans Day of Action,” while including an analysis of race and class, is often seen by participants and onlookers as solely a trans march, as opposed to also being a women’s march and a people of color march.
Even suggesting that organizing center trans women of color specifically is a radical notion. This doesn’t mean that White trans people, trans men and nonbinary people don’t also experience violence and oppression. Of course they do. But I also think there is a serious danger of falling into the trap of looking at anti-trans violence in primarily race- and/or gender-neutral terms. I think this is where the need for a trans feminism of color/antiracist trans feminism comes in.
We also need to move beyond “transphobia” as the way of framing anti-trans violence. Transphobia denotes an individual prejudice and has a taint of victim blaming that reinforces concepts like “trans panic.” I suggest we replace this with “cissexism,” which is better at denoting what is actually an issue of cis power, not just prejudice or a negative attitude about trans people.

Barbara Smith. Front and Center per usual.

transfeminism:

In 1979, Black women were being murdered in Boston. The murders started in January and by April six cis women had been killed. By June, 13 cis women were dead, 12 Black and one White.

Boston Police showed little interest taking the murders of Black cis women they alleged to be prostitutes seriously. So the Combahee River Collective, a Boston Black feminist organization, other Third World feminists as well as White antiracist feminists all with a political understanding of how violence against women is both racialized and sexualized started to organized and rally around the murders of these cis women. Out of this the group CRISIS, with a focus on self-help and community involvement, and the Coalition for Women’s Safety, a coalition of Black, Latin@ and White working to develop programs for community safety, were formed.

Throughout the organizing, Black and Third World feminists encountered conflicts with how the murders were being narrowly framed. Some within the community treated the murders as purely racial, downplaying or ignoring the obvious gendered and sexualized aspects of these killings. And male paternalism contributed to the proposal for Black men “to protect their women.” There were also racial barriers that complicated alliance building between White and Black women over the murders.

To address these and other issues concerning the political consciousness within the communities affected by the murders, the Combahee River Collective produced a pamphlet addressing the question: “Why did these women die?”:

In the Black community the murders have often been talked about as solely racial or racist crimes. It’s true that the police and media response has been typically racist. It’s true that the victims were all Black and that Black people have always been targets of racist violence in this society, but they were also all women. Our sisters died because they were women just as surely as they died because they were Black. If the murders were only racial, young teen-age boys and older Black men might also have been unfortunate victims. They might now be petrified to walk the streets as women have always been.

The pamphlet goes on to give some statistics and notes:

These statistics apply to all women: Black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, old, young, rich, poor and in between. We’ve got to understand that violence against us as women cuts across all racial, ethnic and class lines. This doesn’t mean that violence against Third World women does not have a racial as well as sexual cause. Both our race and sex lead to violence against us.

It’s now 33 years later and I see strong parallels between the sort of organizing that took place around those 13 women and the sort of organizing we need to be doing around the murder and violence taking place against trans women of color.

Within the LGBT community the murders of trans people are talked about like they are solely cissexist or anti-trans based. But like the Combahee River Collective’s analysis of the Boston murders of Black cis women, we need to have an analysis that accounts for the fact that almost all murdered trans people are women or on otherwise on the trans female spectrum, and that the vast majority are women of color. It’s important that we understand that trans people are being targeted as much for their gender identity and race as for the fact that they are also trans.

While the analysis of LGBT organizations tends to be too narrow, the attention these murders get from most feminist and antiracist organizations is virtually nonexistence. The framing of these these murders as the victims transness or sexuality is not helpful to the extent that it lets feminist and antiracist organizers off the hook by being able to say it is a “trans issue” as opposed to a women’s issue or a racial issue.

When it comes to violence against trans women, it’s time we start taking the question “Why did they did?” more seriously. We need to move beyond events like “Trans Day of Remembrance” that intentionally erase the gendered, racialized and classed analysis of why certain trans people are being killed. Even “Trans Day of Action,” while including an analysis of race and class, is often seen by participants and onlookers as solely a trans march, as opposed to also being a women’s march and a people of color march.

Even suggesting that organizing center trans women of color specifically is a radical notion. This doesn’t mean that White trans people, trans men and nonbinary people don’t also experience violence and oppression. Of course they do. But I also think there is a serious danger of falling into the trap of looking at anti-trans violence in primarily race- and/or gender-neutral terms. I think this is where the need for a trans feminism of color/antiracist trans feminism comes in.

We also need to move beyond “transphobia” as the way of framing anti-trans violence. Transphobia denotes an individual prejudice and has a taint of victim blaming that reinforces concepts like “trans panic.” I suggest we replace this with “cissexism,” which is better at denoting what is actually an issue of cis power, not just prejudice or a negative attitude about trans people.

Barbara Smith. Front and Center per usual.

(Source: thespiritwas)

whiteboyfriend:

don’t tell me Michael Sam in the NFL isn’t a big deal

whiteboyfriend:

don’t tell me Michael Sam in the NFL isn’t a big deal

(via amaditalks)

This ‘ish ain’t easy. But I’m doing it.

This ‘ish ain’t easy. But I’m doing it.